Atmospheres 2004 Technical Highlights: Education & Public Outreach

6.1 Introduction

NASA’s founding legislation directs the Agency to expand human knowledge of Earth and space phenomena and to preserve the role of the United States as a leader in aeronautics, space science, and technology. Throughout the 1990s, however, undergraduate and graduate enrollment and the number of doctorates awarded in science and engineering declined by more than 15%. This trend, along with an aging workforce, places an increasing burden on NASA to maintain its level of achievement in science and technology.

In recognition of this problem, NASA established the Education Enterprise in 2003 as one of six Enterprises designed to achieve the Agency’s mission. Within the Enterprises, there are seven strategic goals, two of which are the purviews of the Education Enterprise:

Strategic Goal 6: Inspire and motivate students to pursue careers in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics.

Strategic Goal 7: Engage the public in shaping and sharing the experience of exploration and discovery.

The Laboratory for Atmospheres is part of the Earth Science Enterprise and is primarily focused on the strategic goals of that enterprise. The Laboratory, however, actively participates in activities that support the goals of the Education Enterprise. Laboratory efforts serve the education community at all levels and provide information to the general public. The Laboratory’s educational outreach component enhances educator knowledge and preparation, supplements curricula, forges new education partnerships, and supports all levels of students. Laboratory activities include addressing public policy; establishing and continuing collaborative ventures and cooperative agreements; providing resources for lectures, classes, and seminars at educational institutions; and mentoring or academically-advising all levels of students. Through our public outreach component, we seek to make our scientific and technological advances broadly accessible to all members of the public and to increase their understanding of why and how such advances affect their lives. Education and public outreach are an important part of our basic science activities and go hand in hand with our work on projects, field campaigns, instrument development, modeling, data analysis, and data set development. This section highlights some of the education and public outreach activities of our Laboratory. More details may be found on our Laboratory Web site and on our Branch and Project Web sites.

6.2 Education

Interaction with Howard University and Other Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs)

Partnerships with Howard University:

A part of NASA’s mission has been to initiate broad-based aerospace research capability by establishing research centers at the Nation’s HBCUs. The Center for the Study of Terrestrial and Extraterrestrial Atmospheres (CSTEA) was established in 1992 at Howard University (HU) in Washington, D.C., as a part of this initiative. It has been a goal of the Laboratory and the Earth Sciences Directorate to partner with CSTEA to establish at Howard University a self-supporting facility for the study of terrestrial and extraterrestrial atmospheres, with special emphasis on recruiting and training underrepresented minorities for careers in Earth and space science.

The Laboratory works closely with Howard University faculty in support of the Howard University Program in Atmospheric Sciences (HUPAS). HUPAS is the first M.S.- and Ph.D.-granting program in atmospheric sciences at an HBCU and the first interdisciplinary academic program at Howard University. Scientists from our Laboratory contribute to the HUPAS program as lecturers, advisors to students, and adjunct professors who teach courses. A number of Howard students are now on track for earning M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in atmospheric sciences.

The Laboratory has enthusiastically supported the Goddard Howard University Fellowship in Atmospheric Sciences (GoHFAS) program. GoHFAS was established in 1999 by Professor Sonya Smith to broaden and strengthen the research and educational opportunities of underrepresented minorities. The students attended a summer program at Howard University where they engaged in research with mentors at HU, GSFC, or NOAA. They received fellowships at their home institutions during their senior year and were given an opportunity to visit HU during the winter break to continue their research. The GoHFAS program has assisted in the transition from undergraduate-to-graduate school by exposing students to solving open-ended problems, and giving them a head start by exposing them to the workplace of scientific research. Figure 6-1 shows the summer 2004 GoHFAS participants.

GoHFAS students participating in the summer 2004 Research Program Colloquium. Left to
right the students are: Shawntaye Adams (Clark-Atlanta U.), Coalton Bennett (Howard U), Shyreese Vincent (Clark-Atlanta U),
Eleanor Branch (Stanford U), Daniel Bond (Howard U), Alexia Roberson (Clark-Atlanta U), Lydia Edwards (Clark-Atlanta U), Walter
Lowe (U. Maryland).

Figure 6-1. GoHFAS students participating in the summer 2004 Research Program Colloquium. Left to right the students are: Shawntaye Adams (Clark-Atlanta U.), Coalton Bennett (Howard U), Shyreese Vincent (Clark-Atlanta U), Eleanor Branch (Stanford U), Daniel Bond (Howard U), Alexia Roberson (Clark-Atlanta U), Lydia Edwards (Clark-Atlanta U), Walter Lowe (U. Maryland).

Participation with Howard University on the Beltsville Campus Research Site:

Howard University has for several years been in the process of building a multi-instrument atmospheric research facility at their campus in Beltsville, Maryland. This research facility is part of the NOAA-Howard University Center for Atmospheric Science (NCAS). David Whiteman, Belay Demoz (both Code 912), and others from GSFC are assisting in mentoring students and advising with instrument acquisition for the site. One of the main instruments at the site is a world-class Raman lidar built with heavy involvement from Code 912. The lidar has begun operations and preliminary work on it was reported at the 2005 annual meeting of the AMS in San Diego. David Whiteman and Belay Demoz helped in the proposing, designing, building, and operating the lidar.

A workshop was held at the Howard University atmospheric field research facility in Beltsville, Maryland from June 23–27, 2004. Belay Demoz participated in organizing and lecturing at this workshop in which students from Howard University, University of Virginia, University of Texas at El Paso, Jackson State University, University of Maryland (College Park and Baltimore County) participated. The principal goals of this workshop were (1) to introduce students to, and facilitate student-interaction with, leading atmospheric scientists; (2) to develop both horizontal and vertical mentoring strategies with graduate students and participating faculty members; and (3) to employ experiential methods of learning as a means to motivate students to pursue research in atmospheric sciences. The unique features of the workshop included the participation of diverse faculty, the different research interests among participating students and faculty members, and the support received from numerous institutions and agencies.

Summer Programs

Institute on Atmospheric, Hydrospheric, and Terrestrial Sciences:

The Laboratory for Atmospheres co-sponsored, with the Laboratory for Hydrospheric Processes, a Summer Institute on Atmospheric, Hydrospheric, and Terrestrial Sciences that extended from June 7 to August 13, 2004. The institute is designed to introduce undergraduate students majoring in physical sciences to research opportunities in Earth sciences. No previous experience in these sciences is needed. The program is directed primarily at students in their Junior year, but all undergraduates are eligible provided they are U.S. citizens or holders of a Green Card.

To complete the program students are required to give an oral presentation and submit a written report on their research effort. Oral reports were given on August 13, 2004. The following summarizes the projects carried out under the supervision of Laboratory for Atmospheres mentors.

Table 6. Students and their Project Titles for the 2004 Summer Institute

Student Name

College/University

Mentor and Code

Project Title

Robert Cooper

Williams College

Andrew Tangborn: Code 910.3

With Our Powers Combined—Using Data Assimilation to Estimate Chemical Sources

James B. Miller

Gettysburg College

Geary Schwemmer and David Miller: Code 912

How to Handle a HOE: Self-Calibration of HARLIE’s Backscatter Data

Jacob Gordon

Harvard University

Sangwoo Lee and Geary Schwemmer: Code 912

Elucidation of the HARLIE Overlap Function for Calibrating Data from an Aerosol Backscatter LIDAR

Joel Pommier

Lewis University

David Miller, Geary Schwemmer, and Gerry McIntire: Code 912

Development of an Automation Toolkit for Web Display of Vaisala Ceilometer Data in Near Real Time

S. Joseph Munchak

Pennsylvania State University

Ali Tokay: Code 912/UMBC

 

Retrieval of Three-Parameter Drop Size Distribution from Dual-Frequency Radar

Maura Hahnenberger

University of Utah

Thomas Bell: Code 913

 

Does it Rain Less on Weekends? Detecting a Weekly Precipitation Cycle Using the TRMM TMI

 

Summer Air Quality Study 2004:

During summer 2004, a team of students from Howard University and the University of Maryland participated in a study to better understand pollution in the Baltimore–Washington corridor. The Director’s Discretionary Fund (DDF) was the funding source for this study. The principal investigator (PI) for this program was Anne Thompson (Code 916) and much of the student training was carried out by Jacquie Witte (Code 916/SSAI), Figure 6-2. Balloon launches were carried out several times per week at the Howard University Physics Dept. field site in Beltsville, Maryland. The balloons carried coupled ozone and radiosonde instrumentation to measure profiles of ozone, temperature, and relative humidity. These measurements were part of a larger project funded by NASA titled “IONS” [INTEX (Intercontinental Transport Experiment) Ozonesonde Network Study]. Students presented their first results to undergraduates from a range of HBCUs at Howard’s Workshop on Atmospheric Sciences.

Training at Howard University Physics Department Beltsville facility, showing students
and SSAI�s J. Witte pre-conditioning ozonesondes.

Figure 6-2. Training at Howard University Physics Department Beltsville facility, showing students and SSAI’s J. Witte pre-conditioning ozonesondes.

University Education

Graduate Student Advising:

Numerous Laboratory members are active in advising graduate students and/or serving on thesis committees. The following table provides a summary.

Table 7. Graduate Student Advising by Laboratory for Atmospheres Members

Member/Code

Student

Degree

Institution

Thesis Topic or Area

John Burris/916

John Outerbridge

 

Ph.D.

U. Alabama

Measurement of tropospheric ozone with lidar

 

Shi Kuang

 

Ph.D.

U. Alabama

Modeling tropospheric ozone

Belay Demoz and

David Whiteman/912

Felicita Russo

Ph.D.

UMBC

Lidar measurement of aerosols and clouds

 

Antonia Gambacorta

Ph.D.

UMBC

AIRS water vapor retrievals

 

Menghs G. Mariam

Ph.D.

UMBC

Not defined

 

Segayle Walford

Ph.D.

Howard U.

Lidar boundary layer height characterization

 

Rasheen Connel

Ph.D.

Howard U.

Not defined

 

Scott Rabenhorst

Ph.D.

UMCP

Mesoscale applications of Raman lidar

David Starr/912

Likun Wang

Ph.D.

U. Alaska

Homogeneity of Midlatitude Cirrus Cloud Structural Properties Analyzed from the Extended FARS data set

 

Robert Carver

Ph.D.

Penn. State

Understanding Subtropical Anvil Cirrus: A Coupled-Model Study

Joanna Joiner/916

Paul Poli

Ph.D.

UMBC

Assimilation of global positioning system radio occultation measurements into numerical weather forecast systems

Lorraine

Remer/913

Robert Levy

Ph.D.

UMCP

Development of aerosol retrieval algorithm from satellite for specific use in air quality

 

Brian Vant-Hunt

Ph.D.

UMCP

Investigation of aerosol–cloud interactions in the boreal and tropical forests using satellite retrievals

Scott Braun/912

Joseph Olson

Ph.D.

SUNY-Stonybrook

Impact of coastal orography on landfalling cold fronts

Mian Chin/916

Hongqing Liu

Ph.D.

UMCP

Not determined

Gerry Heymsfield/912

Haiyan Jiang

Ph.D.

U. Utah

Microwave studies of rainfall

Peter Colarco/ESSIC

Rebecca Matichuk

Ph.D.

U. Colorado

Optical properties of Southern African biomass burning aerosols

 

Other mentoring activities:

Martha Butler (NASA Graduate Student Research Program); Penn. State
Randy Kawa/916
Fall 2004 to present
Topic: Modeling atmospheric carbon species

Laurie Buchner (NASA Academy); USC
Paul Mahaffy/915
Summer 2004
Topic: Techniques for isotopic analysis of Martian organic carbon

K-12 Education

Several Laboratory members participated in K-12 education. Lorraine Remer (913) mentored high school senior Jonathan Harris (Eshkol Academy) during the spring semester on the topic of “Deriving aerosol absorption from satellite measurements.” Mian Chin (916) gave two seminars to the NASA Summer School for middle school teachers on July 20and 27. Charlie Jackman (916) presented a talk on Stratospheric Ozone Change to classes at the Air Academy High School in Colorado Springs, Colorado on November 12. Jaime Demick (915/SSAI) gave six talks to second, fifth, and sixth grade students at the Mt. Rainier Elementary School, Mt. Rainier, Maryland on “Careers at NASA.” She also lectured on “Careers in Engineering and Science” at the 2nd Annual EduSerc High School Development Conference at the Baltimore Convention Center (Baltimore, Maryland) on November 5.

6.3 Public Outreach

Distinguished Lecturer Seminar Series

One aspect of the Laboratory’s public outreach is a Distinguished Lecturer Seminar Series, which is held each year. Most of the lecturers are from outside NASA and this series gives them a chance to visit with our scientists and discuss the latest ideas from experts. The following were the lectures presented in 2004.

January 29, 2004: William K.-M. Lau
NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center, Laboratory for Atmospheres, Greenbelt, Maryland;
“Clouds–Aerosol–Precipitation Interactions: A New Frontier in Climate Change Research”

February 26, 2004: Yoram Kaufman
NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center, Climate and Radiation Branch, Greenbelt, Maryland;
“Aerosol Effect on Climate—The Unique Satellite Vantage Point”

March 18, 2004: Wei-Kuo Tao
NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center, Mesoscale Atmospheric Processes Branch, Greenbelt, Maryland;
“A New Approach to using a Cloud-Resolving Model to Study the Interactions between Clouds, Precipitation, and Aerosols”

April 22, 2004: Dennis L. Hartmann
Department of Atmospheric Sciences, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington;
“Tropical Clouds and Climate Sensitivity: The Fixed Anvil Temperature (FAT) Hypothesis”

May 20, 2004: Akio Arakawa
University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), Department of Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences; Los Angeles, California;
“The Cumulus Parameterization Problem: Past Confusions, Current Frustrations, and Future Excitements”

June 17, 2004: Edward Zipser
University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah;
“Global Distribution of Intense Convection from TRMM Data”

July 15, 2004: T. N. Krishnamurti
Florida State University, Department of Meteorology, Tallahassee, Florida;
“On the Hurricane Intensity Issue”

September 16, 2004: Richard Somerville
Scripps Institution of Oceanography, University of California, San Diego, California;
“Clouds, Cloud Physics, and Cloud-Radiation Interactions: New Data and Models”

October 7, 2004: Graeme L. Stephens
Colorado State University, Department of Atmospheric Science, Fort Collins, Colorado;
“On the Use of Global Satellite Data in Evaluating Moist Processes in Large-Scale Models”

November 18, 2004: Mark Jacobson
Stanford University, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Stanford, California;
“The Climate Response of Soot, Accounting for its Feedback to Snow and Sea Ice Albedo and Emissivity”

December 02, 2004: Ulrike Lohmann
Swiss Federal Institution of Technology, Institute of Atmospheric and Climate Science, Zurich, Switzerland;
“Aerosol Effects on Water Clouds, Ice Clouds and the Hydrological Cycle”

E-Theater: NASA/NOAA: Earth Science Electronic Theater 2004

The E-Theater uses high definition television (HDTV) display at up to IMAX size to deliver powerful visualizations promoting Earth science. Scientists from the various Earth science disciplines work directly with the Visualization Analysis Laboratory (VAL) team to develop scientifically accurate visualizations. E-Theater visualizations are rendered at HDTV quality, the highest resolution that can be easily distributed. The visualizations are also available in lower resolutions, such as standard definition TV and as QuickTime movies. Multiple resolution versions of each E-Theater visualization are being added to the E-Theater Web page, http://Etheater.gsfc.nasa.gov/, and the Visible Earth Web page: http://visibleearth.nasa.gov/, along with an explanation of the scientific significance and the origin of the data. The E-Theater has been presented at universities, high schools, grade schools, museums, and government laboratories, as well as to scientists and the general public. A summary of presentations on E-Theater during 2004 is given in Table 8.

Table 8. E-Theater presentations during 2004.

Date

Country

City/State

Size Crowd

Event Description

8-Jan

USA

Columbia, MD

50

High Technology Council of Maryland

15-Jan

USA

Greenbelt, MD

50

Frederick County School District Teachers: GSFC, Building 33 Conference Room H114

20-Feb

USA

Salt Lake City, UT

30

US Department of Agriculture: Forest Service Remote Sensing Center

23-Feb

USA

Salt Lake City, UT

100

Public Officials and Legislators Event: Children’s Museum of Utah

24-Feb

USA

Provo, UT

50

Two seminars at the Brigham Young University, Electrical Engineering Dept.

28-Feb

USA

Salt Lake City, UT

100

Children’s Museum of Utah: Members and General Public Event

1-Mar

USA

Salt Lake City, UT

80

University of Utah Public Lecture: Gould Auditorium of the Marriot Library

2-Mar

USA

Pleasant Grove, UT

40

Mount Mahogany Elementary School

2-Mar

USA

Provo, UT

2

Utah Valley State College

3-Mar

USA

Salt Lake City, UT

80

Children’s Museum of Utah: Supports Event

25-Mar

USA

Key West, FL

750

Key West Middle and High Schools

6-Mar

USA

Key West, FL

50

Mel Fisher Maritime Museum E-theater

8-Apr

USA

Salt Lake City, UT

300

USDA: Remote Sensing 2004—US Forest Service Conference

13-Apr

USA

Greenbelt, MD

50

IRS Tour of Goddard

15-Apr

USA

Atlanta, GA

20,000

US FIRST Robotics Competition: Georgia Dome

23-Apr

USA

Asheville, NC

300

Conference on Science Visualization and the Arts UNC

27-Apr

USA

Greenbelt, MD

50

Historian/Librarian Tour of Goddard

6-May

USA

New York City, NY

300

Rodeph Sholom School

7-May

USA

Radnor, PA

150

Armenian Sister’s Academy of Philadelphia

28-May

USA

College Park, MD

15

Marshall Space Center Director: Admiral Thomas Donaldson

29-May

USA

College Park, MD

25,000

Odyssey of The Mind World Finals: University of Maryland

8-Jun

USA

Greenbelt, MD

20

Howard University Students

9-Jun

USA

Greenbelt, MD

50

Elder Hostel at Goddard Visitor’s Center

16-Jun

USA

Greenbelt, MD

20

Summer Interns

29-Jun

USA

Greenbelt, MD

50

AMS Fellows

31-Jul

USA

Greenbelt, MD

500

Goddard Community Day (Presented by Steven Graham)

20-Sep

USA

Anchorage, AK

300

IGARSS Plenary Session in support of Dr. Asrar

21-Sep

USA

Anchorage, AK

30

IGARSS Scientific Visualization Session in support of JPL organizers

28-Sep

USA

Logan, UT

50

Agriculture Experimental Station—Space Week: Utah State University

29-Sep

USA

Logan, UT

50

Space Dynamics Laboratory—Seminar: Utah State University

1-Oct

USA

Springfield, MO

200

Drury University

7-Oct

USA

Greenbelt, MD

85

Princeton Alumni: Class of 1947 (Contact: Nina Harris, PAO)

13-Oct

USA

Rosemont, PA

250

Agnes Irwin Lower School

13-Oct

USA

Rosemont, PA

350

Agnes Irwin Middle School

13-Oct

USA

Rosemont, PA

400

Agnes Irwin Upper School

14-Oct

USA

Haverford, PA

350

Haverford Lower School

14-Oct

USA

Haverford, PA

400

Haverford Middle School

14-Oct

USA

Haverford, PA

500

Haverford Upper School

21-Oct

USA

Greenbelt, MD

30

Earth Sciences Mission Operations, Bldg 32, Contact: Warren Case (warren.case@gsfc.nasa.gov)

2-Nov

Thailand

Bangkok

NA

Asia Institute of Technology (AIT), Contact: Honda Kiyoshi

10-Nov

Thailand

Bangkok

NA

Thammasat University, Rangsit Campus, Contact: Daroonwan Kamthonkiat

12-Nov

Thailand

Bangkok

NA

Mahaidol University, Bangkok, Contact: Suwisa.Mahasandana@ait.ac.th

15-Nov

Russia

Saint Petersburg

NA

International Symposium on Remote Sensing and the Environment (ISRSE) Plenary Presentation

19-Nov

USA

Baltimore, MD

NA

Mount Vernon Elementary School York County, VA, Contact: Mary Beth Wusk, telephone 757–864–3830

27-Nov

USA

Baltimore, MD

NA

Maryland Science Center, Earth Explorer Institute Workshop

 

Nimbus Meteorological Satellite 40 Year Celebration

August 28, 2004 marked the 40th anniversary of the launch of the Nimbus-1 Earth Observation Satellite. The Nimbus program provided many benefits to the world by increasing our knowledge of the Earth’s atmospheric environment, weather, oceanography, and other geophysical properties of the Earth’s structure. NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) managed the Nimbus program. Starting in 1964 and for the next 20 years, the Nimbus platform was the country’s primary Earth science remote-sensing research and development satellite platform. Seven satellites were launched over a 14-year period and they operated for 30 years. The large, multi-year, multi-discipline Nimbus data sets have been archived and are invaluable for Earth science research. Each Nimbus spacecraft carried instruments that demonstrated new techniques for measuring the Earth’s meteorological and environmental behavior and composition. This technology was transferred to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s (NOAA) new operational satellite instrument designs. The Nimbus research results were applied to NOAA’s application systems, resulting in new tools and processes for weather forecasting, environmental monitoring, and Earth resources assessment. NASA satellites use this technology and the heritage of instruments on most Earth-resources satellites launched over the past three decades can be traced to Nimbus instrument technology and/or scientific accomplishments.

On October 26, 2004, the Nimbus program was recognized at a symposium held at the Goddard Visitor Center followed by dinner at the GSFC Recreation Center. Dr. Edward Weiler and Dr. Jack Kaye welcomed invited guests from around the country who returned to Goddard to celebrate the achievements of the program. Attendees included Bill Stroud, the original Project Manager; Bill Houston, a valued member of the Nimbus project team through all seven missions; Ralph Shapiro, Missions Operations Manager; and many other contributors to the Nimbus Project team. A commemorative bronze plaque (Figure 6-3) has been installed in the lobby of Building 3 near the Gott Auditorium to honor the Nimbus Mission Operations Control Center once located there.

The bronze plaque commemorating the 40th anniversary of the Nimbus Program.

Figure 6-3. The bronze plaque commemorating the 40th anniversary of the Nimbus Program.

6.4 Project Outreach

Funded projects in which Laboratory members participate contain elements of both education and public outreach that are described on the project Web sites. Some of these outreach efforts are summarized in the following sections.

TRMM

TRMM web header.

The Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) is a joint mission between NASA and the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) designed to monitor and study tropical rainfall. TRMM continues its comprehensive Education/Outreach program, in which Laboratory personnel promote TRMM science and technology to the public under the leadership of TRMM Project Scientist Robert Adler (910), and TRMM Education and Outreach Scientist Jeffrey Halverson (912/JCET). TRMM has also included the development of broadcast visuals and educational curriculum in its outreach activities. The Education link on the TRMM home page leads to five problem-based classroom modules in PDF format. These manuals are titled “Investigating the Climate System” and consist of tutorials on clouds, winds, precipitation, weather, and energy. The first four are appropriate for students in grades 5–8, the last is directed at students in grades 9–12. These packages are available on the TRMM Web site (http://trmm.gsfc.nasa.gov/) and have been reviewed as a part of the ESE Education product review.

EOS Aura

The Aura satellite was launched from Vandenberg AFB on July 15, 2004 (Figure 6-4). The Laboratory for Atmospheres has responsibility for conducting the Education and Public Outreach (E&PO) program for the EOS Aura mission. Aura’s Education and Public Outreach program has four objectives:

  1. Educate students about the role of atmospheric chemistry in geophysics and the biosphere;
  2. Enlighten the public about atmospheric chemistry and its relevance to the environment and their lives;
  3. Inform geophysics investigators of Aura science, and thus, enable interdisciplinary research; and
  4. Inform industry and environmental agencies of the ways Aura data will benefit the economy and contribute to answering critical policy questions regarding ozone depletion, climate change, and air quality.

Photo of the Aura launch on July 15, 2004.

Figure 6-4. Aura launch, July 15, 2004 photo taken by Boeing/Thom Baur.

To accomplish these objectives, the Laboratory has partnered with several institutions that have established infrastructures that reach large audiences through formal and informal education.

The Globe Program (Global Learning and Observations to Benefit the Environment), supported via a grant to Drexel University (Philadelphia, Pennsylvania), is a worldwide network of students, teachers (10,000 schools in over 95 countries), and scientists working together to study and understand the global environment. Aura’s E&PO program will also be present at science and environmental fairs, and science and technology conferences to demonstrate how Aura fits into NASA’s program to study the Earth’s environment.

The American Chemical Society (ACS) will produce four special issues of the publication ChemMatters over the next three years. These issues will focus on the chemistry of the atmosphere and various aspects of the EOS Aura mission. The special editions of ChemMatters will reach approximately 30,000 U.S. high school chemistry teachers and their students.

The Smithsonian’s National Museum of Natural History (NMNH), working with Aura scientists, will design and create an interactive exhibit on atmospheric chemistry as part of its Forces of Change program. NMNH will convey the role that atmospheric chemistry plays in people’s lives through the use of remote sensing visualizations and museum objects.

For further information, see the Aura Web site at http://aura.gsfc.nasa.gov/.

EOS Terra

Terra web header.

The EOS Terra outreach effort—under the direction of Yoram Kaufman (Code 913), Jon Ranson (Code 920), and David Herring (Code 913)—is a coordinated effort to foster greater cooperation and synergy among the various outreach groups within the EOS community. The Terra mission is designed to improve understanding of the movements of carbon and energy throughout Earth’s climate system.

The “About Terra” link on the TERRA home page (http://terra.nasa.gov) contains links to five tutorials designed to inform the public about the importance of the physical parameters observed by the instruments aboard the Terra spacecraft. These tutorials deal with the properties of aerosols, changes in cloud cover and land surface, the Earth’s energy balance, and the role of the oceans in climate change.

TOMS

TOMS web header.

The Atmospheric Chemistry and Dynamics Branch is committed to quality scientific education for students of all ages and levels. The TOMS Web site contains resource materials for science educators at http://toms.gsfc.nasa.gov/teacher/teacher.html. Three lessons that make use of TOM’s data and that study the uses of Earth-orbiting satellites are presented at this site. One of these is directed at students in grades 5–8, the others at grades 9–12. There is also a link to five projects for independent research that allow advanced students to learn more about atmospheric chemistry and dynamics.

There is also an online textbook at http://toms.gsfc.nasa.gov/ozone/ozone_v8.html, written by branch scientists and designed as an educational resource for the general public, as well as for students and educators. This book contains 12 chapters covering all aspects of the science of stratospheric ozone. Each chapter has numerous low- and high-resolution figures, and ends with a set of review questions.